An Inventor

After our little surprise discovery on my previous post, that really took us all by surprise, today we will look at another side of Thomas Caddy. This time as an inventor. The information provided here was shared with me by Wendy Chapman.

I will in due course, follow up on Thomas’ misdemeanor and see if we can get to the bottom of what happened next. Did he serve a time in prison or did he get let off with a fine? I was seriously thinking we may have to start searching convict records, however we do know that he remained in England, and went on to have several more children.


A.D. 1884, 18th  July 1884. No 10,289

Improvements in Fire Bars

PROVISIONAL SPECIFICATION

I THOMAS EDWARD CADDY of No 1 Fountain Terrace, Alfreton Road Nottingham Moulder in the County and Town of Nottingham do hereby declare the nature of my Invention for IMPROVEMENTS IN FIRE BARS to be as follows: –

An air tube chilled faced fire bar and made of various lengths and sizes to suit all kinds of boilers and furnaces, and by a special application of moulding the whole of the faces are chilled thereby hardened and made very durable and strong. The improved method of moulding the bars consists of the metal running round the wrought iron tube thereby causing the chill which will be enough to case-harden the bar. There will be a further improvement by the faces of the bars being cast upon metal plates thus causing additional hardening of the faces of the bars by this process. Figure 1 is a longitudinal elevation shewing (sic) the tube bent at front end of bar which hangs below the front bar bearer which has corresponding slots cast in to admit the bend to pass below bar bearer. Figure 2 is a transverse section of fire bar through centre shewing wrought iron tube.

Figure 3 is a plan shewing two bars together, I claim also that the air passing through the wrought iron tubes keep the bar cool, and the air passing over the fire at the back end of the fire bar bearer will cause combustion of the carbons thereby burning the smoke and economise the amount of fuel to a great extent. The dead plate of back end of furnace on which the bars rest will have slot holes cast in to allow the dust to fall through thus preventing choking the tubes through the bars.

Dated this Seventeenth day of July One thousand eight hundred and eighty four.

THOMAS EDWARD CADDY

Improvements in Fire Bars


(A similar document in August 1884)

A.D. 1884 – No 10,289.

Caddy’s Improvements in Fire Bars

COMPLETE SPECIFICATION

I, THOMAS EDWARD CADDY of No 1 Fountain Terrace Alfreton Road Nottingham Moulder, in the County Town of Nottingham do hereby declare the nature of my Invention for IMPROVEMENTS IN FIRE BARS and in what manner the same is to be performed, to be particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement:-

An air tubular chilled faced fire bar and made of various lengths and sizes to suit all kinds of boilers furnaces and fireplaces by a special application of moulding the bars face down, the whole of the faces are chilled thereby hardened and made very durable and strong. The method of moulding the bars consists of the metal running round the wrought iron tube thereby causing the chill which will harden them. There will be a further improvement by the faces of the bars being cast upon metal plates, thus causing additional case hardening of the faces of the bars. The bar Fig 1 is a longitudinal elevation shewing the tube bent at front end of bar which hangs below the front bar bearer which has corresponding slot holes cast in to admit the bend to pass below bar bearer. I also make these bars without the bend at end, and further claim to cast the bars with one or more wrought iron tubes and where two or more lengths are required to form a complete fire bar the tubes will stand one inch or more out from end of the bar and enter into a cavity at end of the continuing bar or bars to a corresponding depth for connecting the air tubes and conducting the air from one bar to another. Fig 2 is a transverse section of fire bar through centre shewing wrought iron tube. Fig 3 is a plan shewing two bars together. I also claim that the air passing through the wrought iron tubes keeps the bar cool and by passing through the tubes becomes considerably heated which prevents unequal expansion and contraction of the boiler plates, which is caused by the cold air passing over the fire. The air passing through the bars at the back end of the fire bar bearer, will cause combustion of the carbons thereby burning the smoke and economise the amount of fuel to a great extent.

Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of my said Invention and in what manner the same is to be performed I declare that what I claim is

1st Fire bars cast round one and more tubes and having their faces chilled substantially as herein described and illustrated in the Drawings.

2nd Heating air for consuming smoke by passing it through the tubes in the fire bars substantially as described.

Dated this Twenty-first day of August One thousand eight hundred and eighty four.

THOMAS EDWARD CADDY

LONDON: Printed by Eyre and Spottiswodde,

Printers to the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty.

For Her Majesty’s Stationery Office

1884


 

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About Jenny MacKay

Just a person who is looking forward to retirement and enjoying the golden years!
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8 Responses to An Inventor

  1. Pingback: Victorian Tradecard | jenealogyscrapbook

  2. Pingback: Caddy, Keddy, Denney – It’s all relevant! | jenealogyscrapbook

  3. Pingback: Victorian Tradecard | Caddy Scrapbook

  4. Pingback: Caddy, Keddy, Denney – It’s all relevant! | Caddy Scrapbook

  5. john herbert says:

    I notice he had his own business “Caddy and Co”. He really moved on from his previous experiment in casting.

    Like

  6. raymond says:

    this would have given our warships an advantage by being able to stay at sea longer and the air cooled bars lasting a lot longer .GOOD INVENTION

    Like

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